Status Quo – Hastings Beer & Music Festival – Alexandra Park Hastings 1st July 2006

supplied by Barry French

Who remembers going to this?

Nigel Goodman… Sat at home with windows open listening

Sandra Cunningham… Yes brilliant night xx

Dawn Leaney… Remember it well!

Virginia Davis… Yes. Went to all three nights that year.

Tony Davis…  I went with my wife Claire and think i spent most of the evening bouncing up and down with my hands on her shoulders. Very short set from what I remember but did enjoy it

Graham Belchamber… Yes excellent night

Mick May… Yes good night

Wendy Weaver… Very short set but brilliant. Danced a lot had a really good night.

Keith Veness… We were there Great night

Mike Mitchell….  Seem to recall the crowd were still calling for an encore as their bus, watched their bus leaving…

Steve Thorpe… Was there, they played some tracks from Rockin all over the world I seem to remember

Here’s a short clip from Andrew Clifton

Trying to locate members of Bern Elliott & The Klan

Michele Wilson asks

I am trying to locate the old band members of Bern Elliott’s group The Klan. They were on Ready Steady Go 4th September 1964. Can you help me. I am trying to put a programme together about the band. Thanks. Miles & Michele Wilson.

Terry Lucas… Hi luv I tidied Bern and The Klan Dave cameron, ex Fleewrekkers, lead guitar, Tim Hughes rhythm guitar and vocals( passed away) Andy Knottley skins, Trevor Haworth bass I think, memory is failing me, this might help though

SMART 47 coffee meet report

Great start to the new year and one of our busiest meets so far. Among the newbies this time were Tony Court-Holmes and Cedric Paine. Tony had lots of memories of working at The Anchor and also chatting about when he worked in Prinny’s George Street and remembers it when it was The Sombrero Cafe. Cedric was chatting about Blind Faith and the Isle Of Wight Festival and had some interesting stories of when he was working with Eric Clapton and George Harrison. Paul Morfey had with him his vinyl collection of Claire Hamill LP’s and was talking about the Claire’s track You Take My Breath Away which was on The Voice last week. Mick O’Dowd arrived with some interesting Mod & Northern Soul cd’s. Barry French had with him the rare LP version of Grand Funk Shine On with the original cover in bi-visual 3-D and fun was had looking through the blue and red lensed glasses to view it. He also had his Status Quo ticket from when they appeared in Alexandra Park. John Busbridge had with him his photo album of cuttings and tickets and John Parnell had an old photo of his dad’s furniture shop in Norman Road. Sarah Harvey was talking about Hastings Rock meeting has just taken place and information will be available soon and Barry Taylor has confirmed he is putting together another Barefaced Music charity event later in the year for St Michaels Hospice. As expected lots of chat about the future of the pier and also the funny Mark Steel Radio 4 show on Hastings. Positive response to the changes at The White Rock Theatre with regard to the seating, what future now if any for HMV and lots of interest in the mods outside Dimarco’s photo from 1964. Sorry if I didn’t get a chance to chat to you but this is just a very small bit of what I remember, anyone who wishes to add anything interesting you were talking about, then please feel free to do so.

Andre Martin… Great way to start the New Year aand to see so many old faces.

Mick O’Dowd… Nearly standing room only. Great Meet. Well done Alan. Where do you keep finding theses interesting people?

Caz Simpson… Thank you Alan for your warm welcome to the SMART meeting, we really enjoyed ourselves xx

 

 

Magpie 1970’s Theme Tune – co written by Ray Fenwick

Robert Searle….Spencer Davis group.

Tony Qunta….I seem to remember Ray did mention that, although no disrespect I was much more interested in the fact that Jenny Hanley was one of the presenters. 😉

Terry Pack… And Susan Stranks!

Pete Prescott… yes he was involved with Spencer Davis and (i think) Eddie Hardin. He used to get royalty cheques for years.

Ken Copsey… Me and Huggy gave him a call a year or so ago as I noticed a Rickenbacker 12 string for sale on Gumtree which I remembered using in the Teenbeats. Think he is living in Norfolk. We just wanted to say hello and let him know there was no longer any ill feelings between us. He sounded just like uncle Ray had always sounded, man!

Pete Fisher… Used to love this programme…the theme’s other co-writers were Eddie Hardin and Spencer Davis…Susan Stranks looking glamorous at teatime

Harry Randall… Wish I got a royalty cheque!

 

 

Supertramp – Breakfast In America review by Neil Partrick

Album cover of ‘Breakfast in America’ (released on A&M Records; artwork by Gothic Press, London)

I wrote a review of the LP ‘Breakfast in America’ 40 years on.

Supertramp’s ‘Breakfast in America’ reconsidered Perhaps it’s a matter of age, temperament, and the amount of your adolescence that you spent hiding from your parents. Confident ‘rock’ albums of the 1970s, whether by pre-punk behemoths Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin or punk posers like The Clash, are these days widely accepted in polite, white, male, middle-class circles. However Supertramp’s ‘Breakfast in America’ (released March 1979) had what for some was a more appropriate soundtrack to ‘suburban’ bedroom angst than the shed-load of pop platitudes that still pervaded about rebellion, ‘frontlines’ and class conflict (including from Pink Floyd). Such bourgeois issues usually didn’t penetrate the minds of those living in net-curtained semis, where entertainment was of the family variety and politics was what two parties usually only did every four or five years.

To be fair, Supertramp had, since ‘Crime of the Century’ in 1974, been chronicling, among other things, late teenage fears and, sometimes, coping mechanisms. On ‘Breakfast in America’ however we get the band’s principal singers and songwriters, Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies, in two set-piece lyrical and vocal contests over meaning and materialism in the west. On ‘Goodbye Stranger’, Rick Davies semi-ironically trumpets every young man’s apparent desire for personal freedom of a decidedly non-political kind, while Roger Hodgson’s backing vocal offers some salutary ripostes on the essential emptiness of such a lifestyle. On ‘Child of Vision’ it isn’t so much America that is being taken down by Hodgson with a Christian disdain for hedonism and other sins of Mammon, but the west in general.

This connected to a me as a schoolboy in Sussex, England who was beginning to question the values he had been brought up on, but who didn’t relate to those for whom calls to ‘destroy’ or ‘revolt’ had provided an effortless, and essentially meaningless, release. Unlike the Sex Pistols’ single, ‘God Save the Queen’, which was banned two years earlier, ‘Logical Song’ was a Top Ten UK hit that actually addressed the stigma that anyone who sought to articulate their social disconnection could be made to feel, rather than moronically equating an economically-struggling social democracy with a ‘fascist regime’. Hodgson expressed what some school kids were feeling, using adjectives shocking to a BBC Radio 1 audience and that admittedly ‘O’ Level English students would be more comfortable with. However he wasn’t being pretentious. When Pink Floyd celebrated illiteracy, and got a surprise Christmas Number One on the backs of working class kids from a north London primary school, they most definitely were.

Above all perhaps, ‘Breakfast in America’ is strong on ‘hooks’, big on ‘catchy’, and shows a band at the peak of its powers. It was to be a pretty abrupt downward trajectory after this album, but then Supertramp’s ability to melodically sing about insanity, adolescence, and loneliness was more at home in the 1970s. At the time that ‘Breakfast in America’ came out, the American rock critic Robert Christgau begrudgingly conceded its musicality but then held it against Supertramp when he claimed that tuneful vocals and beat weren’t the same as feeling and rhythm. Perhaps these things are in the ear of the beholder. However there is emotion aplenty on this album – in voice and subject matter – and ‘Child of Vision’ positively swings. ‘Take the Long Way Home’ chronicles personal alienation; ‘Lord Is It Mine’ has Hodgson laying himself emotionally bare. Alone and in need, he thanks God for giving him hope and teaching him humility, but wrestles aloud with his inability to sustain his faith. Using the ugly language of today: this ‘impacted’ me at the time. The whole of ‘Breakfast in America’ still does, forty years later.

Lindisfarne – Hastings Pier 17th January 1975

Photos by Chris Meachen

Steve Cooke… Alan with Kenny Craddock on keys in 1st pic. Still miss these two every day – made and played some great music with them.

Tony Court-holmes… I was there

Martyn Baker… Yep. I went to that one too. They were excellent.

Tim Moose Bruce… Saw them at White Rock in the 80s. Great gig.

Robert Paine… Remember this group

Chris Meachen…  I kicked the dressing room door down for them too.. (they were locked out..) earned a crate of ‘Newcastle broon’ for that….

Maureen Head… Loved their music.

Anyone remember a 60’s Bexhill group called The Spirits?

David Betts asks… I was in a band called The Spirits,in Bexhill in the sixties and would like to track down any pictures that anyone might have or memories.Band line up was me,Dave Betts ,lead guitar,Colin Watford vocals, Dave Neal bass,Johnny Orchard rhythm guitar and Dave Gibbs drums.Hope this might ring some bells.

Alan Esdaile… Not Johnny and The Spirits, Dave, who supported The Rattles on the pier?

David Betts… No sorry not them.

Dave Nattress… The Spirits – sort of. Bexhill. Dave are you the brother of Sue Betts? Went to school with Sue from infant to Downs Secondary Modern and my old dad, long gone was a friend of Jack Neal who I think was Dave’s dad. Pretty sure Sue had an older brother who played guitar. Also, what I definitely remember is a graffiti of “The Spirits” on a wall by the Downs Secondary School – girls side back then. It was there for a long time – early band graffiti like I say, faced out by the footpath that led to the kitchen/dining room. All, a very long time ago.

David Betts… That’s me,Sue still lives in London Rd the graffiti was on the old railway arch.

Phillip Earle… I’m sorry to tell you that Dave Neal passed away at the end of last year after a long illness.

David Betts… Sorry to hear that,Dave and me were schoolboy buddies an knocked around together. I remember a Stuart Earle and Earle’s bakery, any relation?

Laurie Cooksey… Dave Betts was in my class briefly at B’hill Down Boys’ School and I remember he lived in a white weatherboard cottage in Belle Hill, just above Barrack Road, long since demolished. The Spirits were the first live band I ever saw and it was on the same Sat eve that Brian Poole and the Tremeloes performed their 1st single, ‘Twist little sister’ on Thank Your Lucky Stars. The Spirits’ gig was at Victoria Hall, Town Hall Square, Bexhill. The Spirits’ painted name remained on a brick wall next 2 the Downs Infant school until not that very long ago. Hope that’s of interest. I’d love 2 meet up with Dave again. Best wishes, Laurie.

Sarah Whites… The Spirits…what a band!! Often had ‘gigs’ in halls around the town and in Sidney. I especially remember them playing in the hall opposite St Peter’s in the Old Town. The mid 60’s were very special!! Does anyone remember the monthly ‘Beat Raves’ at the De La Warr?? I think organised by a very enterprising Malcom Christmas??…. Some fantastic bands. Long John Baldry, The Foundations?? The Spirits were very close to my heart and very very sad to hear about Dave Neal. Dave Betts, I think had a sister called Marie who was a professional dancer in London?? I remember the graffiti….the band had a very strong and loyal local following.

Tony Court-holmes… i think you mean sidley not sidney thats a hell of a way to go for a gig

David Betts… Still searching for pics of the band from that era if you ever come across any,let me know.I still get down to Bexhill at least once a year.

Rolling Stones – Hastings Pier 18th January 1964

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stones-ticket

Ad supplied by Andy Gunton

Andy Gunton… I was sent this photo by a friend earlier, I think it’s from January 1964? He found it while doing some musical research, not sure where.

Andre Martin… For some reason it’s been printed on red, this was the second visit from the boys in 1964

Alan Esdaile…  The only other thoughts I have is, was it an ad in a What’s On type magazine?

Jill Caine… Awwwww memories!! I woz there.

Mick O’Dowd… This is a colour version of the Observer ad.

Mick Knights… I  do remember that I couldn’t afford the 2/6 entrance!

Martin Richter… rolling who…..?

Jill Caine… I was there. behind the bar until the Stones came and then into the ballroom to see them!!!

Glenn Piper… Pity I was only 7 at the time

Gavin Martin… Long haired layabouts .. They look like gurls. I wouldn’t let my great grandmother anywhere near them

Pauline Lindsay… I was there to and remember it well.

Helen Kingshott… I was there to 

Peter Fairless… Their Decca EP was released the day before, ‘Bye Bye Johnny’ and ‘Money’ on the ‘A ‘ side, ‘Poison Ivy’ and this on the ‘B’ side. One of our favourites…

Terry Haddon… Me as well Pauline,great night

Bob Laurie.. Opened with “King Bee” as I remember! Cycled over from Bexhill in the freezing cold to see!

What is your favourite song from Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons?

Alan Esdaile… Mine is probably Beggin’.

Matt Thomas… Walk Like A Man

Nadia Compagnone… Beggin. One of my favourite songs. Tremendous performers.

Chris Pook… Down The Hall is my favourite.

Mark Harris… I was playing that on YouTube just the other day, great song, reminded me of Centre Page!

Chris Pook… Know what you mean Mark. I used to enjoy playing that one.. The song that reminds me of Centre Page (well Tony Bird anyway), is Love Will Keep Us Together originally by Capt & Tennille.

Mark Harris… They were our heroes! Rennies on a Thursday night!

Alan Essex… Marlena

Leigh Wieland-Boys… You’re Ready Now.

Sandy Max… Oh what a night! Otherwise known as December ’63

Sid Saunders… Big girls don’t cry.

Andy Qunta… They have a lot I love but I think my fave is Rag Doll.

Caz Simpson… Saw him twice live and Jersey Boys twice, love him. Rag Doll sigh

Matt Thomas… Saw them mid 90’s at Congress Theatre in Eastbourne, what a fantastic show

Dave Edwards… Rag doll

Mick O’Dowd… No Surfin’ Today

Dave Nattress… So many, but special memories go to “Opus 17 don’t you worry ’bout me” from 1966 when I was 13 and one summer seems like for days and days on end round a friend’s house playing this and other notable singles 6 at a time on his parents’ stereo radiogram thing, a big bunch of us lurking and dancing around – all such innocent fun times. Great song, maybe not as well known as most

Phil Goring… For me, got to be their first hit,Sherry, when they first came to the notice of the UK.

Steve Maxted… Rag Doll, on our jukebox too