Battle Dance Club – Epiton Entertainments – Battle Memorial Hall 1971

jan 1971 - battle april 1971 - battle may 1971 - battle

june 1971 - battle sept 71 - battle nov:dec 71 - battle

supplied by Nigel Ford

Phil Gill… See, that’s 30p and 40p admission and I notice there’s no banjos. Just sayin’…..

Jan Warren… This has “stirred” some things in my very blurred memory banks??!! ……. and whether its relevant or not, I remember going to gigs somewhere in a village hall near or around Battle, also I recall a band called “Blue Condition” with Dave Gurr and a girl singer, I think they did a version of “Venus” by “Shocking Blue”?! – anyone else?? – yes, of course I remember “Suspect” and Rock Machine …….. well, I still have this album, I know it has nothing to do with the band advertised but its another old classic compilation album of the time.

Lance Collins… Symphonic Crab brings back memories Gerry Fortsch.

Colin Fox… As I recall, O’Hara’s Playboys were a great band, I saw them at the Sundowners Club in Eastbourne.

Andy Qunta… Great to have reminders of some of those names I had forgotten & others I remember really well!

Phil Wade Eyes Of Blond… The January date fills in a blank in our scrapbook – thanks! The April date was shortly after we broke up (March 24th) so we must have had to cancel it  🙁 Great to have this stuff after all this time – thanks again.

Geoff Peckham… I definitely saw your band there, Phil. It was the January date and it was pretty impressive!

Robert Searle… Some really good groups there

Mick O’Dowd… Didn’t The Bedrocks have a cover version of Ob-la-di at the same time as The Marmalade? O’Haras Playboys were also a good little band.

Alan Esdaile… Yes, well remembered Mick.

Alan Pepper… SUSPECT 4 BARLEY 3

Factory New CD Aiming High

Harvey Summers… It gives me great pleasure to announce the new Factory album is now available exclusively from www.HarveySummersMusic.com Downloads come with full artwork and CD quality WAV downloads are available. Physical CD’s are pre-order currently but also come with a free immediate download of the CD quality WAVs. Go!

Steve Kinch… Anyone who knew/knows me from the 70s in Hastings, will know that I used to play in a band called “Factory”. We were: Andy Qunta on keys, 12 string guitar & vocals; Tony Qunta on guitar, violin and vocals; Lol Cooksey on drums, and myself on bass (replacing “Jaffa” Peckham, who left in 1974). We’d play the length and breadth of the UK, sometimes venturing to mainland Europe. I guess you’d call it my first full-time band. Unfortunately, the much sought after record contract eluded us. Consequently, none of the material was ever properly recorded. Fast forward to 2020… Some of those songs from then have now been properly recorded and are available to download. Bass duties are shared between myself and Jaffa. The album was recorded the good old fashioned way: Four guys in a room all playing together 🙂. Vocals, and one or two overdubs done later. NB Andy wrote “Tribal Statistics” featured on Manfred Mann’s Earth Band’s album “Somewhere in Africa”. He was also co-writer of “You’re the Voice”, which became a worldwide hit for John Farnham. You could say, Andy honed his songwriting chops with “Factory” 🤘Download “Aiming High”, the perfect lockdown companion 

Robert Blackham… This is a fantastic rock album – I love it.  Great melodies and performances.  Bob

Remembering Alan Jensen Disc Jockey Record Shop – by Tony May for Hastings Town Magazine

Remembering Alan Jensen (‘Big Al’ And The ‘DJ’).

In the early 1970’s a local businessman-Johnny Hodgson, owned a record shop in the Old Town of Hastings entitled ‘The Disc Jockey’. The shop was doing very well but Hodgson had other business interests (like the promotion of bands on Hastings Pier) and these were beginning to take up more and more of his time. Johnny decided to put an advert in the local paper for someone to help him run the shop. Alan Jensen (at this point working for Courts) applied for and got the job. Hodgson and his wife (who ran a hairdressers shop in the Old Town) were well known locally and Johnny had political ambitions. In 1972 those political ambitions became a reality when Johnny was duly elected as a Hastings Councillor. Seeing his chance, Alan Jensen offered to buy Johnny out of the shop. His offer was accepted and the pair went their separate ways.

A larger than life character and a born showman, Alan soon managed to make a success of ‘The DJ’ (as it became more commonly known) and swiftly set about moving premises to a more central position in Hastings at the bottom of Queens Rd. For a short time, the shop was renamed ‘The Disc Jockey +1’ but Jensen had another way in mind about how to stamp his personality upon the shop… the invention of ‘Big Al’ – a caricature ‘mascot’ of Jensen himself (the medallion around the ‘creatures’ neck featured the words ‘I Like Big Al’).

‘Big Al’ was a massive success and gave the shop a unique (and very memorable) image. ‘Big Al’ appeared in all the shops newspaper advertisements and on all of the shops printed bags. With his beautiful and glamorous wife Sue at his side, Alan swiftly established ‘The DJ’ as the most popular and trendy place to buy your records in Hastings. A chart of the DJ’s best selling singles and albums appeared weekly in The Hastings Observer and regular ‘competitions and give-aways’ ensured that another smiling picture of Alan (along with the latest winner/s) was frequently in print. In short, Alan Jensen was not just a flamboyant and confident character he was a fine businessman.

Then of course there was the shop’s staff. As conclusively proven by his wife Sue, Alan was definitely a man with an eye for the ladies and invariably the shop would have a bevy of beauties behind the counter. While in today’s day and age such a practice might be frowned upon, (like the similar period practice of offering ladies free entry to nightclubs) it certainly ensured that the DJ was frequented by most of the young male record buyers in the town… including me!

It is worth mentioning here also that in the 70’s and 80’s competition to The DJ was fierce and there was at least 8-10 places (not including second hand outlets) in Hastings town centre alone where you could buy records, tapes (and latterly cd’s)..

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