Francis Rossi of Status Quo – White Rock Theatre Hastings. Sunday 3rd May 2020

Legendary Status Quo lead singer Francis Rossi will share the extraordinary secrets of his 50-plus years in rock’n’roll when he takes to the stage for an intimate evening of chat and music. In Francis Rossi: I Talk Too Much, the founder, lead singer and lead guitarist of Status Quo will talk about his mishaps and adventures of life on the road with one of the biggest and most loved bands ever.

For tickets and details… https://whiterocktheatre.org.uk/Online/tickets-francis-rossi-hastings-2020

Sarah Harvey… That’s quite a lot of notice for a gig…. over a year away

Alan Esdaile… I thought the same and doubled checked it.

Jack Irving… It’s only 13 months!

Wendy Weaver… Wont mention his age but his insurance premiums would be mega

 

Stallion – Live At The Lyceum September 1976

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Of the many obscure, trench-coated progressive rock groups that germinated in the garages, sheds and rehearsal studios of England in the early ’70s, Stallion deserve to be recognised as one of the great lost bands of the first progressive era. Hailed critically, and by those lucky enough to see them perform, Stallion appeared on the same stage as many of their more well-known contemporaries including Motörhead, Stackridge, Rare Bird, Stray, The Edgar Broughton Band andTraffic. Despite winning a Melody Maker magazine competition and playing on the main stage at Reading Festival in 1976, and having successfully merged progressive rock moves with punk attitude, major label success eluded Stallion and they broke up in the late ’70s a well-kept secret.This new CD contains their rare single and fragments of “the album that never was”, together with a history of the band and previously unseen photographs.

Sound Engineer… Dave Hinde.

Phil Thornton….Stallion play ‘The Hard Life’ recorded live at the Lyceum Ballroom, London. September 1976 supporting Motorhead.

Paul E Newcomb… Stray were the headliners that night… Motorhead second and  Dirty Tricks (?) third. Stallion had won the MM folfkRock competition that year I believe

Phil Gill… Correct as to line up, but Motörhead might have headlined.

Phil Thornton… Yes I think it was Motörhead headlining – the PA was theirs and they were charging other bands to use it !!

Pete Fisher… I was living in London then, but didn’t come along to the gig…guess I didn’t hear about it…funnily enough the band I joined that year got to the final of the MM Folk/Rock competition the following year in 1977 (after winning the semi-final at the Marquee), but didn’t win…

Dave Nattress… Just wonderful to hear this. Stallion were just so good and this proves it. In Damaris we had the privilege to play support a few times on the pier and we totally loved, respected, revered and admired this band. They were where we wanted to go. 43 years ago. Frightening. Brilliant that there are these recordings and my clear recollection of their tight musicianship and the spectacular whirling dervish performances of John Wilde come right back to me, and visuals aside John was a wonderful vocalist, great tone and delivery. Congrats to all, great memories and sad that not all the guys who took the Stallion road are no longer with us. Got the CD album a few years ago and play it a lot, great that Phil T and the guys were able to get it out

Phil Gill… Damaris were none too shabby as I recall. I remember a song about a “city punk” that always stuck in my head.

Dave Nattress… Thanks Phil, nice one. I have the lyric somewhere, just found it, yes I was big on rhyming and City Punk was followed by the line “Lived on Junk”, a not so obsure double meaning which was also something I liked to put in. We had some out-there tracks and themes and lyrics, tracks about weird stuff like “Star Tiger” which was the call-sign of an aircraft that disappeared over the Bermuda Triangle, “Alien Tomorrows” a space journey influenced piece, eampling part of the planet suite, never can remember if it was Mars or Jupiter – Iain Cobby puts me right. Trawled up a load more lyrics of our songs, “The First Survivor” one man thinking he’s alone on the planet after the proverbial nuclear war, “Rubic’s Cube”, “Jack the Ripper”, another with references to characters from Lord of the Rings – blimey were we up ourselves or what!! Anyway good, good days!! Best wishes Phil.

The Disc Jockey’s Hastings Carnival float , 1959

supplied by Leigh Kennedy – Historical Hastings facebook group.

Alan Esdaile… Any idea who the group is playing?

Roy Penfold… From the HH group – ‘Possibly the Dolphin Jazz Band’ : Aviva Treger comments… My Dad played the trumpet in the Dolphin Jazz Band – their poster is on the front of the truck. I think they might even be in the main photo, facing away from the camera on the float itself. The person standing has a double bass, the person to the far right a trombone. So, by the strangest coincidence, my Dad is probably in this photo.

Dave Nattress… Would never have thought the Disc Jockey was a sold as to do 1959! Is this George Street? Was thinking just the other day, way before it was pedestianised we used to drive along there and I think, emphasise think, it was wide enough for car-parking one side – south, and for vehicles to pass but is this faded memory wrong?

 

The Jam – Hastings Pier 23rd April, 1977

John Storer..I can’t seem to find any mention on the site of The Jam playing The Pier. True, there were only about 20 of us there but Q Magazine did print an article about the gig several years back.

Peter Fairless….There were no posters or flyers because The Jam were a last minute replacement booking. As I recall, refunds were offered and not many people stayed. There were badges given out, anyone still got theirs?  Anyone got the ‘Q’ article? It was the week before ‘In The City’ was released, yes, Alan. That’s right, Peter, he took a turn for the worse, LOL. I read somewhere that it was only twenty who stayed, John. I thought it was a few more but hey, it was one of the best gigs I’ve ever seen!

Peter Bridger…..They were standing in for Johnny Thunder who had “tonsillitis”. Dead from an o/d a few weeks later so I think the diagnosis was a bit off.

John Storer…They were supposed to have been supporting Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers, who never turned up. The gig was cancelled and everyone was told they could get their money back. When I got to the kiosk at the front of the pier, one of the bouncers told me that The Jam were going to play anyway. Very few of us decided to stay on … I remember counting 23 in the audience.  The band joined everyone in the bar afterwards and I saw both Bruce Foxton and Paul Weller on separate occasions as punters at later gigs on the pier.

the jam first single

John Storer….Four months later, the night before we were off to Reading Festival in fact, I wore the badge to the Pump House. There was a girl in there I’d not seen before, wearing a “Genesis” badge. We argued at length on the merits of our respective musical allegiances and denigrated each other’s taste in music. We’ve been married 35 years!

Chris Pelling…..I recall Paul Weller’s dad, I think, prowling to and fro in front of the front of the stage wielding a baseball bat should the massed throng (!) decide to invade the stage. In the event I don’t think the baseball bat was used in anger. Johnny Thunders? He actually lived on for several years – he died in strange circumstances in New Orleans in 1991. The badge? Pretty sure I have one at the bottom of a deep box in the loft – one wet Sunday afternoon a box that I must have a rummage through!

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supplied by Sarah Harvey

Sarah Harvey….Here is the advert that appeared in the Observer on April 23rd, 1977 that advertises The Violation as support for Johnny Thunder.

Who was the most disappointing band….

Sarah Harvey… This is for those of you who frequented The Pier during the 1970s….. what was the most disappointing bands / artists you saw. NO local artists allowed because ALL local artists were and still are brilliant . For me, it was the Sex Pistols, I thought they were dreadful!

Peter Fairless… I agree, Sarah, they were dire. The worst band I saw, though, were Eater, they supported The Stranglers in March ’77, they were even worse!

Alan Esdaile… I will have to think on this one. Mind you if the band were bad, we would end up in the bar getting wasted on cheap cider.

Peter Thomson… There was a Boxer/Crawler/Moon gig and none of them set the world on fire, but one lot spent their time on stage arguing almost to the point of fisticuffs. Not a musical memory to enjoy

Nigel Goodman… Gary glitter no glitter band taped backing suspected miming too

Jim Breeds… I can’t think of any disappointing bands/artists because beer.

Glenn Piper… I agree with Sarah also. There may have been worse bands, but the dichotomy between them and Budgie seemed to emphasise just how bad they were. (If that makes sense 😀)

Dave Weeks… I watched the thunder storm when they were on.

Linda Day… Paul and Barry Ryan

Chris Meachen… I thought Magma were piss poor as far as entertainment went.. They were quite clever musicians, but none of them appeared to be taking a blind bit of notice of what the others were playing…

Phil Gill… Chicken Shack. I spoke to Stan Webb afterwards, all bright eyed and bushy tailed, saying how much I liked his playing and he was a totally miserable.

Pete Prescott…The 2nd gig I ever did was supporting chicken shack at Kemsley town hall (near sittingbourne) yeah he wasn’t the most happy chap… mind you Kemsley would make most people lose the will to live !

Dennis Torrance… I think most of the time if band were bad it might have been down to how without the technology then. I liked curved air and remember quite a lot of feed back. I still look back on them pier days with a smile

Read moreWho was the most disappointing band….

SMART SOUNDS by Colin Bell reviewing Girl In A Million (The Complete Recordings) Twinkle 2cd set

GIRL IN A MILLION (The Complete Recordings)  Twinkle
Housed in a deluxe digipack, as the title suggests, this release brings together all of Twinkle’s output for the first time, from the hit Decca period through to later releases on Instant. President and Bradleys. Twinkle (real name Lynn Ripley) is of course remembered for ‘Terry’ a so called (by the press) ‘death disc’ coming on the heels of others like ‘Tell Laura I Love Her’ and the Shangri-La’s ‘Leader of The Pack’ released a couple of months before ‘Terry’ became a no.4 hit in December 1964. ‘Terry’ might have been a simplistic teenage angst song, however it should be noted that she was a mere 14 when she wrote it, and having racked my brain I can’t think of another female singer/songwriter who had been in the charts before. Twinkle’s background couldn’t have been any further from the world she was writing about. Growing up in a mansion in Surrey hers was a world of priviledge and wealth, she attended school with the likes of Camilla Parker-Bowles, frequented Royal Ascot and went to the South of France with Dame Margot Fonteyn and Rudolph Nureyev. She was however a rebel and from a tender age hung out at London clubs Esmeralda’s Barn (notoriously owned by the Krays at one time) and The Cromwellian. Her boyfriend was Dec Cluskey (the Batchelors) and it was Dec that arranged the demo of ‘Terry’ to be heard by Decca, who immediately signed her. Although she’ll always be remembered for ‘Terry’ there was so much more to Twinkle. Her follow up single ‘Golden Lights’ is a glorious slice of pop and one of my own personal favourite female vocal songs of the 60’s, a view shared by Morrisey in the 80’s when he covered it in The Smiths, he simply loved her.
Her vocal on Golden Lights is far more representative of her work, highlights of Disc 1 include ‘Aint Nobody Home By Me, ‘Tommy’, a great cover of Skeeter Davis’s ‘The End Of The World’ , ‘Micky’ an insanely catchy earworm of a song (not the Toni Basil song!) and topped off with the previously unissued live ‘Sha-La-La-La-Lee’ (Small Faces), which could have come from the NME Poll Winners show? Disc 2 mainly comprises of the ‘Michael Hannah’ LP.
Michael was the great love of Twinkle’s life who died at an early age in a plane crash, the songs are poignant ‘Caroline’ ‘Joanna’ and ‘Soldier’ in particular and shows the fragile state of Twinkles mind at the time. Concluding the set under ‘Later Recordings’ is a take on Neil Diamonds ‘I’m A Believer’ and her self penned ‘Holiday Romance’ another glorious and mature track. Twinkle was never concerned with the money and adulation of the music business, in her won words she ‘just wanted to be famous’. Well she certainly achieved her goal. Sadly after a five year battle with cancer she passed away on the 21st May 2015 after a happy life. RIP Twinks and thanks for the music. The 2cd set is released this Friday 19th on RPM Records,

Til next time……………..Happy Easter To All,

Colin

Alan Esdaile… According to Keith Tooke, Twinkle spent here honeymoon in Hastings 72/73 staying at the Queens Hotel.

Tony Court-holmes… poor girl

Sue James… I have Terry the single

Josie Lawson… I loved this song. I had the 45 record. Must have worn it out. Played and played it cos my first boyfriend had a motorbike..no he didn’t crash but he broke my heart. Anyway, listening today and seeing Twinkle singing it, in my opinion didn’t give the same impact. I find this with many songs. Listening to them either from record, tape, radio gives them more of an impact than seeing the singers sing them. There has only being two singers in my opinion who are great at both and that are Gerry from Gerry and the Pacemakers and Gene Pitney…

Pete Brazier… Can’t wait! Sounds like A Good Album to get!