You Had To Be There! – The Rolling Stones live 1962-69 by Richard Houghton. With memories of Hasting Pier gigs. Now available.

You-Had-To-Be-There-The-Rolling-Stones-Live-1962-69-by-Richard-Houghton

The Rolling Stones Live In The Sixties

A new book about the career of the Rolling Stones, out 1st October 2015, gives a front row perspective on the group’s early live shows and includes memories of their performances in Hastings. Amongst the shows remembered in You Had To Be There: The Rolling Stones Live 1962 – 69 are concerts which took place in Hastings on 18th January, 11th April and 1st August 1964.

The book, written by Richard Houghton and published by Gottahavebooks, contains over 500 eyewitness accounts of the band’s very first performances, beginning with pubs and clubs in and around London and culminating in their 1969 Hyde Park show.  It also contains previously unreleased photos of the band. Included in the book are the memories of –

Maurice Viney, ‘The boys on the stage were very young but their music was excellent. The main point I remember was that a very nice young lady removed her pants and threw them at mick in the centre of the stage.’

Andre Palfrey-Martin,  ‘It was branded the second Battle of Hastings – the mods and rockers were just about to kick off.’

The publication of You Had To Be There:  The Rolling Stones Live 1962 – 69 coincides with the recent announcement of a major Rolling Stones exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery in London next year.  The group have been performing live for more than 50 years and interest in the group’s early days is stronger than ever. Richard Houghton said: “I got the idea for the book last year when I went to see the Rolling Stones perform in Stockholm.  Mick Jagger was about to turn 71 and it occurred to me that many of the people who saw the Stones when they were starting out would be of a similar vintage.  Fifty years ago they were teenagers and I thought it would be good to capture those memories of the early Stones shows before they fade.” Richard Houghton said: “This book is not just about the Rolling Stones.  It’s also a window on the past, a look at what it was like to grow up in 1960s Britain.  Teenagers hadn’t really been invented until the Rolling Stones came along and they played a part in opening many people’s eyes to what was possible.  The Stones helped to make the Sixties swing.” Richard, who lives in Manchester, said: “I’ve been lucky enough to capture some great anecdotes of people who saw the Stones on their journey to stardom.  They started out as a group of rhythm and blues aficionados sometimes playing to a handful of people in a pub and became the greatest rock’n’roll band in the world.”

Richard did not see the Rolling Stones live in the 1960s himself, although his mum did take him to see The Beatles.  He was four years old, and the Fab Four are the subject of his next book.

You Had To Be There: The Beatles

Richard said:  “I’d love to hear the memories of anyone who saw The Beatles in the 1960s, because they set the entertainment world alight when they came along and there will be lots of people out there who heard them or saw them and just thought “wow”.”  You can share your Beatle memories with Richard on thebeatlesinthe60s@gmail.com

You Had To Be There:  The Rolling Stones Live 1962 – 69 can be ordered from:

http://gottahavebooks.co.uk/stones/ and http://www.amazon.co.uk

Or email sales@gottahavebooks.co.uk

Tony Court-holmes… nice boys never get anywhere

Andre Martin… Go to page 151

 

 

Rolling Stones – Hyde Park 5th July 1969

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supplied by Philip John

Philip John…..Going through a pack of press cuttings i found this Archive account of the Stones in Hyde Park back in ’69. I think it really catches the changes taking place at that time.
I remember I was there with an old school friend, Paul Dobson who later developed the RSD Sound system company. We travelled up from Cheshunt Herts by train, I was wearing a pair of curtains my mother had brought back from India, poncho style ( think Clint in ‘A Fist Full of Dollars’,) over a purple shirt, jeans and fringed boots, I really thought I looked the business till we got to the park and found ourselves surrounded by thousands of very cool London groovers who could spot out of towners right away.
That aside we had a great day, the sound wasn’t all that good but this was the Stones live in concert and me and Paul along with thousands of others were part of it.
Anyone else got memories of that concert ?

Alan Esdaile…..I was there. Loved King Crimson. I remember wearing my Woodstock armband which I got from Atlantic Records for joining the uptightoutasight club and a hippy bell round my neck!

Anne Wells……I helped run the uptightoutasight (Atlantic/Stax appreciation club) while working for Polydor (incorporating Atlantic, Stax etc) in London in 1968-69. Probably posted off your armband !(as only 3 of us ran it). Also went to the Stones Hyde Park concert.

Alan Esdaile…..Excellent, Anne. Its bizarre what triggers these odd memories. I even remember the record that was sent to me – Brook Benton Rainy Night In Georgia. Coming back to the Stones gig another great band that does not seem to get any mentions nowadays is ‘ Family’. They were really  good.

Redstar Richter….not me – but my partner is in the official film 🙂

John Wilde….Family, great band Alan, saw them many times, thanks for the reminder.

Geoff Peckham… I missed the Stones’ one, but went to the Blind Faith concert at Hyde Park. Also on the bill were: Donovan, Ritchie Havens, Third Ear Band and the ubiquitous Edgar Broughton. A fab day out

Wendy Weaver… I  was there. Long way for the stage. I remember the cargo nets up to the front of he stage and bouncers throwing girls back into the crowd.