When James Taylor and Joni Mitchell came to The Lord Nelson Hastings

supplied by Adam Daly

Adam Daly… sharing a letter from a family friend, mentioning the time back in the late 60’s that James Taylor and Joni Mitchell popped into the Nelson for a few drinks

Dave Nattress… Really!! Incredible did not know this!! Two of the world’s most wonderful musicians. Some amazing albums. Blue by Joni Mitchell a personal favourite and then Sweet Baby James by James Taylor.

Paul Gray… All the legends went to the Nellie! John Martyn and Nick Drake to name but two!

Rock Night 2 – The Lost Boys, Jump The Gun, No Worries. Marina Pavilion 20th June 1992

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poster & cutting supplied by Pete Prescott

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supplied by Alan McCleave

Pete Prescott….that was a fun night, jump the gun were very good, dave woods was amazing and the place was packed. Probably the best time for the lost boys.we were twenty four years younger and at least that many stones lighter ! The place was always packed. I have a few of those nights on video.
I tried to appreciate The Lost Boys and those gigs. I knew it was never gonna be as good again. It was like a great big social club. So many people going mad. Brilliant times.
At the time there were 5 bands in the u.k.called The Lost Boys, we found that out when we registered the songs on the first tape we put out (remember cassettes!?)

Alan McCleave… Hastings rock night. Dave wood, ernie Ballard, joe rytlewski, Peter Prescott, Jez Gillette, mick burt + a host of others.

Redstar Richter… eek – played on stage with most of that lot!

Ernest Ballard… Hey hey. What a memory. My old rock band JUMP THE GUN. On a fab night gigging with the other rockers in Hastings. It was a bloody great night as I remember. Happy days. And when we all had hair!! X

Pete Prescott… Who fancies identifying them left to right !

Martyn Baker… I think you’re there Pete.

Andy Knight… I remember that night!

Nigel Polley… i was there

Steve Simpson… How weird. The singer from another band I played in now has a band called Jump The Gun.

Roland Groves… Saw Jump The Gun at Berties Bar in the early nineties.

Ernest Ballard… Cassettes yes they worked well. Just used to chew up. Then they were totally trashed. The gig was awesome. Didn’t we have some great times Pete. Happy memories

Martin Richter… nice line up 🙂 some faces there 🙂

Joe Knight… Great!!!

John Logie Baird remembered

supplied by Jim Breeds https://www.facebook.com/HAPP1066

Hastings and Area Past and Present… On 14th August 1888, television pioneer John Logie Baird was born in Dumbartonshire. He died on this day, 14th June 1946 in Bexhill aged just 57. In early 1923, and in poor health, Baird moved to 21 Linton Crescent, Hastings, on the south coast of England and later rented a workshop in the Queen’s Arcade in the town. Baird built what was to become the world’s first working television set using items including an old hatbox and a pair of scissors, some darning needles, a few bicycle light lenses, a used tea chest, sealing wax and glue that he had purchased.

Alan Esdaile… He should be celebrated more locally and have a dedicated major attraction to him.

Fiona Evans… Yes, we should make more of our local history & culture. Most famous date in history, birthplace of TV, May bank holiday celebrations, pirates, Alan Turin etc. Could we not impress upon the council to do more/encourage entrepreneurs to make more of Hastings?

Marcus de Mowbray… Hastings: Home of TV, Home of lousy TV reception!

Kate Recknell-Page… I remember coming home from Guides with Heather one night to find mum & dad sitting in darkness watching TV in black/white on a 14” John Logie Baird – our very first TV !!! Wow

Mike Waghorne… Baird House was by Bexhill station it has been knocked down and replaced by a block of flats aptly named Baird House !

Andy Qunta… What we would have missed without his invention!

Colin Bell… Andy, Why does Charlie’s Angels come to mind?!..

John Beeching… His invention was a bit of a flop. (There was nothing on worth watching.)

Factory – Chelsea College Eastbourne 16th June 1973 and Andy’s diary

Supplied by Andy Qunta

Ernest Ballard… I’ve got stuff in my garage from years ago. Some chewed by mice 😀. Lovely to see this memorabilia.

Andy Qunta… thanks! I don’t remember seeing this before, but it was a while ago!

Phil Gill… Could’ve bought two notebooks for the price of that gig.

 

 

SMART SOUNDS by Colin Bell reviewing The Merseybeats / The Merseys: I stand Accused – The Complete Merseybeats and Merseys Sixties Recordings 2CD Set

I STAND ACCUSED   The Complete Merseybeats/The Merseys 60’s Recordings 2CD Set)

Probably one of the best of the bands that emerged from Liverpool in the early 60’s giving rise to the term Merseybeat. This handsome new digipack 2CD collection contains absolutely everything a fan of the band could wish for. It features every known recording by both incarnations of the band, including demo’s, outtakes, alternate versions and even home recordings. It also includes side projects recorded in the same time frame and rare sides that collectors highly prize.  In a city swamped with bands as Liverpool was with The Beatles & Gerry & The Pacemakers leading the field it must have been hard to stand out in a morass of quite frankly similar sounding bands, The Merseybeats originally started life as The Mavericks in 1960 the founders were two 15 year olds Tony Crane and Bill Kinsley. In 1962 the famous MC and Booker of The Cavern Club Bob Wooler had taken an interest in the band  re-dubbed them The Pacifics which only lasted a week before that changed yet again to The Merseybeats, a name the band initially thought a bit corny but they stuck with it. Like everyone in the local scene they knew Brian Epstein and were hoping he would take them on and guide them as he had done with his other famous acts. He promised them this would be the case but the guys got tired of waiting and then, in what they admit now as a rather silly fit of pique, they went their own way when Epstein refused to buy them suits! ‘He’d bought The Beatles suits but not us’ admitted Bill & it hacked us off. They had made a couple of home demos by now ‘All I Have To Do Is Dream’ &’So How Come’. For the full and fascinating story of these early days the accompanying 24 page booklet to this new set is an excellent and comprehensive read. But in short by 1963 the band had made the pilgrimage to London and signed with Fontana Records. They scored their first hit with ‘It’s Love That Really Counts’ the track that opens CD1 a Burt Bacharach number written originally for The Shirelles it gave the band their first taste of success hitting No 24. However it was their second hit that really defined the bands image. ‘I Think Of You’ was a beautifully crafted ballad written by Peter Lee Stirling, later to have his own success as a singer under the alias Daniel Boone with ‘Beautiful Sunday’. It wasn’t really the direction the band saw themselves going in as basically balladeers, they were more beat orientated but you can’t argue with that sort of success. ‘I Think Of You’ went Top 5 and i think still stands as one of the classiest records to stem from the Liverpool scene. But even as they were riding high founder member Bill quit the band unhappy with their management. He was replaced temporarily by Bob Garner (later of The Creation) & then permanently by Johnny Gustafson of The Big 3.  With Johnny on board the band had 2 more hits with another excellent ballad in ‘Don’t Turn Around’ & ‘Wishin & Hopin’ also a hit for Dusty Springfield. In 1964 Bill returned to the fold but although they continued to issue a steady stream of good records further chart success eluded them. By 1965 the ‘beat boom’ was over and Merseybeat had become passe. It was at this point that into Tony & Bills lives stepped 2 people very well known to myself (as my future bosses) Kit Lambert & Chris Stamp of Track Records & most famous as being behind The Who. Kit had seen the guys playing in a London club and was interested. However Kit & Chris were expending their energies on The Who and it wasn’t until after ‘Anyway Anyhow Anywhere; had provided the band with their second hit that Kit signed The Merseybeats and started producing them. He produced 3 singles ‘Soldier Of Love’ a cover of James Browns ‘I Love You’ Yes I Do’ and ‘I Stand Accused’ all good records but commercial failures. In January 1966 the news came that The Merseybeats had split up. Again the full story behind that makes for some fascinating reading in the booklet referred to earlier. Bill & Tony emerged as a duo with their name shortened to The Merseys. They went on tour supporting The Who and then cut what would become to my mind one of the greatest singles of the 60’s in ‘Sorrow’. Originally a ‘b’ side to The McCoys single ‘Fever’ which flopped, it was taken up by Kit and as well as Bill & Tony the original studio version recorded also featured Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Jack Bruce & Tornados drummer Clem Cattini. Strangely their label Fontana rejected this first version and it was re-recorded after they had got shot of Page! (that couldn’t have happened too often). ‘Sorrow’ was a Top 5 hit and has become an iconic 60’s record, loved by millions including Bowie who recorded his own cover version for his Pin Ups album. Sadly in terms of commercial success ‘Sorrow’ would prove to be the bands last hit despite some fine follow ups, including ‘So Sad About Us’ Pete Townshend’s composition later to appear on The Who’s ‘A Quick One’ album.  By 1968 and their final single ‘Lovely Loretta’ the band had become unhappy with the way things were and their management. They returned to being The Merseybeats and played the ‘cabaret’ and nostalgia circuits. This didn’t suit Bill who left to work as Liverpool Express in the 70’s. Things came full circle in 1993 when Bill & Tony re-united once again as The Merseybeat’s and continue to play regularly across the UK & Europe. This retrospective is an often fascinating and rewarding look at a band that has now spanned 60 years. As previously mentioned i believe as both The Merseybeats & The Merseys they made some of the classiest records of the 60’s and you will find plenty to enjoy in this 63 track compilation. It’s all housed handsomely in a digipack with a wealth of photo’s and as already mentioned the package contains a well written and absorbing history. Enjoy.

For more information go to https://www.cherryred.co.uk

Till next time… stay safe… Colin

 

Alan Esdaile… Colin, I agree on ‘I Think Of You’ and love your description ‘classiest record to stem from the Liverpool scene’.

Who else was born at Fernbank Old London Road Hastings?

3rd March 1977

Ian Cramp… My kids were born at The Buchanan

Steve Cooke… Oh yes, I was. Photo explains a lot about me I feel. Very Hammer House!

Steve Mann… Me

Paul Crimin… Why does a book by Charles Dickens leap to mind when I look at the picture of this building?

John David Martin… And me

Terry Corder… No me, I was born in St. Helen’s Hospital, but I used to pass Fern Bank twice a day going to and from school.

Samantha Blake… I was in 1967 x

Andrew Blake… I was in 1969 and so was my other half in 1973

Alan Esdaile… apparently the nurse dropped the scissors with me, when the chord was being cut.

Pauline Richards… Am not admitting to the year!

Ann Graves… My daughter was born there in 1969

Chris Meachen… My birthplace in 1955… Dad was a bus conductor, & would get his driver to stop in old london road, then run up to give mum flowers or chocs..

Stephanie Blackledge… My sister Nicky Dann

Nicola Dobson… I was born there in 1952

Tony Davis… I was

Margaret Trowell… Husband was born there in 1945.

David Edwards… Yep!

Sam Rosewell… My brother was born there in 1972 and I remember being taken there to see him and my mum! I think my dad may also have been born there in 1949

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Maxi Priest – Downtown Saturdays, George Street, Hastings 8th August 1985

lp image: discogs.com

Colin Bell… That term ‘live on stage’ has always amused me. I don’t recall ever appearing on stage ‘dead’….some might disagree with that of course………

Kevin Hilton… Although some acts have ‘died’ on stage.

Tony Davis… I’ve certainly died in front of an audience at some gigs. Fortunately the good far outweigh the bad

Mike Vawdrey… But you could be live off-stage – like the late Little Richard, Marion Williams and bluesman Albert Collins who used to go walkabout with his massively extended guitar flex – were Health and Safety informed ? !

Steve Mann… I was there that night