Live Music From Dr King `Hardship Lane’ – Electric Palace Hastings Friday 21st September 2018

ticket info... https://www.electricpalacecinema.com/whats-on

Dr King was an integral part at the beginning of London’s famous 12 Bar Club, and has worked over the years with three of the true giants of British acoustic guitar: Bert Jansch, John Renbourne & Davy Graham. On Friday 21 September he’ll be accompanied by a few special guests, covering a full suite of raga crossovers with Arabic, Celtic and flamenco influences.

Alan King… I’m returning to Hastings Old Town on Friday 21st September 2018- for a gig at the Electric Palace, High Street, Hastings Old Town TN34 – Tickets £10:00 – 8:00 p.m. It will be my last ever gig.

‘Absolutely brilliant music, a joy to watch’ – Green Man Festival

‘The best gig I’ve seen in Hastings for years’ – Forum post

‘The best gig I’ve seen anywhere for years- – Forum post

‘One of the most remarkable and memorable gigs I’ve ever seen’ – Forum post

‘Exceptional musicianship’, ‘Genius guitar picking’, ‘Fantastic guitar’ – Forum post

‘King provided the platform for Bert Jansch to step out of the shadows and into the sun’ – Bert Jansch Biogrophy

‘King was most of the brains behind Vic Reeves’ Big Night Out’ – Malcolm Hardee

‘King could be as funny as Reeves but wasn’t ambitious’ – Bruce Dessau (Guardian, Time Out, Evening Standard)

‘Shit’ – some fat bloke who lives just off George St

”I’m calling the police and you’ll get nicked’ – some other fat bloke

‘But it’s not even music’ – some old woman with a 2nd hand shop

‘That bloke who plays the Pat Metheney shit’ – overheard in the Dragon Bar

Review from Neil Partrick…  http://oldfolkrebels.blogspot.com

The Prisonaires – Searching for The Old Folk Rebels – Review of Electric Palace Hastings gig 1st July 2018 by Neil Partrick

Photo: Neil Partrick

Alan (left) with Bobby Valentino (fiddle), Les Morgan (drums) and Tony Reeves (right,bass)

The Prisonaires Live at the Electric Palace Hastings

“Is this a supergroup?” asked a friend of mine as we took our places last night in the third row of this tiny, historic, yet barely half-full Hastings cinema. If about 250 years of combined experience playing with some of the most important western musicians of the 20th Century fits the bill, then The Prisonaires are definitely a supergroup. While not household names, any blues, jazz-rock, folk, or rock enthusiast will understand that these gentlemen were pivotal to some of the most ground-breaking music of the 1960s and ’70s. Yet there were plenty of empty seats in a venue that only has 48 of them.

Acoustic guitarist and leader of the band, Alan King commented wryly that scheduling a gig during an international football tournament is always a disaster. But can it be that south-coast music buffs preferred staying at home to watch telly in the hope that Argentina would defeat the French, than attending a gig of this quality? When The Prisonaires finished their set a member of the audience stood up and shouted that it was the finest gig he’d seen in Hastings in years. It was one of the finest gigs I’ve seen anywhere in years.

Musical impresario, Alan King was a doyen of the famed 12 Bar Club, the ‘60s Soho music venue that gives the name to Dr King’s ‘12 Bar Music’, the platform for this and for some forthcoming Electric Palace gigs. King told me outside the Gents – the Electric Palace is so small that the toilets are never far away – that he is lucky enough to have played with his favourite guitarists, Davy Graham and Bert Jansch, and his favourite singer, Miller Anderson For many years King also played with his favourite songwriter, Alan Hull (of Lindisfarne).

The aura of Graham and Jansch hung over proceedings as King opened the set riffing on the rite of passage folk guitar tune, ‘Anji’. What the advance publicity promised would be a hybrid of The Pentangle and Can, “with a touch of Miles Davis’” jazz-rock-funk fusion, was underway. ‘Anji’ went from sounding like The Pentangle were performing it, to something with a lot more attitude. Almost like Fairport Convention’s ‘A Sailor’s Life’, but lifted beyond even that wonderfully free-flowing, folk-jazz hybrid  However I couldn’t detect the influence of Can on this or on any of the other tunes The Prisonaires performed last night. It was undoubtedly an eclectic set though, and The Prisonaires have certainly embraced Can’s determination to kick against the musical pricks.

To read more of this review please click the following link… http://oldfolkrebels.blogspot.com/2018/07/the-prisonaires-live-at-electric-palace.html